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50 Most Influential Science Fiction titles March 10, 2007

Posted by Administrator in Blogging, Literature.
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Myers is generally a useless hack, but in terms of pure science without philosophical musings (for which he is worse than unqualified) he has his uses, and I am appalled to discover that we share an interest in speculative fiction (often referred to as “science fiction.”).

Anyway, someone made a list of the 50 most influential SF titles. I’m noting mine in bold below the fold. List yours in the comments.

The Lord of the Rings, J.R.R. Tolkien
The Foundation Trilogy, Isaac Asimov
Dune, Frank Herbert
Stranger in a Strange Land, Robert A. Heinlein
A Wizard of Earthsea, Ursula K. Le Guin

Neuromancer, William Gibson
Childhood’s End, Arthur C. Clarke
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, Philip K. Dick
The Mists of Avalon, Marion Zimmer Bradley
Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury
The Book of the New Sun, Gene Wolfe
A Canticle for Leibowitz, Walter M. Miller, Jr. (Unashamedly Catholic.)

The Caves of Steel, Isaac Asimov
Children of the Atom, Wilmar Shiras
Cities in Flight, James Blish
The Colour of Magic, Terry Pratchett
Dangerous Visions, edited by Harlan Ellison
Deathbird Stories, Harlan Ellison
The Demolished Man, Alfred Bester
Dhalgren, Samuel R. Delany

Dragonflight, Anne McCaffrey
Ender’s Game, Orson Scott Card
The First Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever, Stephen R. Donaldson
The Forever War, Joe Haldeman
Gateway, Frederik Pohl
Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, J.K. RowlingB (Started it, could not finish it

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, Douglas Adams
I Am Legend, Richard Matheson
Interview with the Vampire, Anne Rice
The Left Hand of Darkness, Ursula K. Le Guin
Little, Big, John Crowley
Lord of Light, Roger Zelazny
The Man in the High Castle, Philip K. Dick

Mission of Gravity, Hal Clement
More Than Human, Theodore Sturgeon
The Rediscovery of Man, Cordwainer Smith
On the Beach, Nevil Shute
Rendezvous with Rama, Arthur C. Clarke
Ringworld, Larry Niven
Rogue Moon, Algis Budrys
The Silmarillion, J.R.R. Tolkien
Slaughterhouse-5, Kurt Vonnegut

Snow Crash, Neal Stephenson
Stand on Zanzibar, John Brunner
The Stars My Destination, Alfred Bester
Starship Troopers, Robert A. Heinlein

Stormbringer, Michael Moorcock
The Sword of Shannara, Terry Brooks

Timescape, Gregory Benford
To Your Scattered Bodies Go, Philip Jose Farmer

To this, I would add Last Call and The Drawing of the Dark by Tim Powers

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Comments»

1. Peter Sean Bradley - March 15, 2007

You read Dhalgren.

I plopped down a month’s allowance for that book when it came out in the mid-70s and realized I had purchased the worst book ever written.

Yet it ranks in the Top 50.

2. demolition65 - March 15, 2007

I never said that these ARE the best. . .only that I had read some of them.

And while Dhalgren by no means is a great novel, Delany had hacks like Varley beaten like the neighborhood dog back in the ’70s.


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